Posts categorized as: pkm

The One Software Tool I Can't Live Without for Doing Polymathic Knowledge Work

Published by Matt Stine

Today, there is an app, website, or software platform for almost anything (including an app that does absolutely nothing). But when it comes to being a polymath who’s learning, thinking, and creating all day, there is one app I can’t live without: Logseq And here’s why: I never have to leave my Daily Journal Logseq opens to a new journal page daily, and it always structures this page as an outline.

How You Can Use Hemingway's Bridge to Ship Today's Momentum to Tomorrow

Published by Matt Stine

Today I’m going to tell you how to use a creative strategy called the Hemingway Bridge. I learned this strategy from reading Tiago Forte’s book Building a Second Brain, and I immediately started applying it to my daily work as a software engineer and architect. It has been life-changing! If you learn and use it, you’ll start every day with a burst of momentum because you sent it to your future self as a gift.

How I Got Interested in Personal Knowledge Management

Published by Matt Stine

I wouldn’t call myself an expert in Personal Knowledge Management (PKM). However, I have honestly spent countless hours reading and learning about PKM. And I have been practicing various forms of PKM in my life for the better of 15 years. So many things have changed during those 15 years: The things we choose to label as PKM The techniques we use to practice PKM The technologies we use to implement PKM But one thing hasn’t changed, and I learned it early in my journey.

The Best Way to Get Started Learning About Personal Knowledge Management

Published by Matt Stine

I love learning about Personal Knowledge Management (PKM)! I first got interested in this topic at least 15 years ago (it wasn’t known as PKM then). It was overwhelming trying to figure out where to start at the time, and it’s only gotten worse. Last year, I discovered Tiago Forte’s online cohort-based course, Building a Second Brain. Rarely will I reach for the word “life-changing,” but the value of having so much curated knowledge experienced within a community has earned that label over the past year.

Think You Don't Need a Dev Log? Laboratory Scientists Would Disagree

Published by Matt Stine

Laboratory science has much in common with software engineering: We take a new language or technology and experiment with it to see what it can do and how it performs. When we practice Test-Driven Development, every failing test that we write encodes a hypothesis: that the test actually will fail! We gather and study data obtained from our system and its surrounding environment as we troubleshoot incidents. We hypothesize causes, and we try to reproduce results.