Posts

The Morning My Worldview Disintegrated in London City Airport

Published by Matt Stine

I remember sitting in London City Airport at 5:00 AM, watching TV through a coffee-fueled haze as the 2016 U.S. presidential election returns scrolled across the chyron. The impossible was now something I had to accept. A world that I thought I knew. That I thought I understood, was no more. A worldview that I had fortified for fifteen years, in an instant, had disintegrated. A worldview that had been instilled in me by my parents and the church in which I grew up.

How I Turned a $200 Carrot Into a Writing Habit

Published by Matt Stine

It’s Day One of shipping an Atomic Essay every day for 30 consecutive days. Ship 30 for 30 gave us a recommended day one prompt, and I am here for it. So why are we going on this journey in the first place? I really needed a firm kick in the ass to get back into writing. I’ve published dozens of articles. I’ve even published a book! But it’s been a very long time since I described myself as a writer.

Six Developer Experience Killers Every Engineering Manager Should Avoid

Published by Matt Stine

This was originally a Twitter thread. I’ve edited it a bit for style and format to make it a bit more friendly as a blog post. I asked my Twitter following to share with me via DM their biggest frustrations with their day-to-day developer experience. I committed to report back with a summary of everyone’s responses. Well, here’s my report! Some of their answers weren’t a surprise. But not all of them!

Upcoming Cloud Native Architecture Training on O'Reilly's Safari

Published by Matt Stine

I’m offering online training in Cloud Native Architecture via O’Reilly’s amazing Safari platform. Several dates still have openings: September 6-7, 2017: 12:00pm - 4:00pm EDT September 13-14, 2017: 12:00pm - 4:00pm EDT October 4-5, 2017: 12:00pm - 4:00pm EDT More dates will be announced soon. Designed for software architects and senior developers working on medium-to-large scale enterprise systems, this two-day, hands-on course will introduce you to the cloud native architectural pattern language and give you practice applying it.

Cloud Native App Arch Training

Published by Matt Stine

I’m offering a two-day, intensive, hands-on training course at the upcoming O’Reilly Software Architecture Conference in Boston, MS. The class is entitled Cloud-Native Application Architectures with Spring and Cloud Foundry In this class you will have the opportunity to implement an easy-to-understand storefront system (complete with product search, details, reviews, and recommendations) as a cloud-native architecture using Spring and Cloud Foundry. In addition, you’ll get hands-on exposure to the Netflix OSS family of technologies.

Learning to Go, Part I: Interfaces

Published by Matt Stine

This article was originally published in the April 2014 issue of NFJS the Magazine. This article begins an introductory series on the Go programming language. Go is a language optimized for large-scale software engineering and is rapidly becoming the language of choice for building cloud services. It does this in a very interesting way, optimizing for simplicity rather than complexity and taking a “less is exponentially more” approach. Three ways in which this really stands out are:

Microservices are SOLID

Published by Matt Stine

Microservices are often described as small, loosely coupled applications that follow the UNIX philosophy of “doing one thing well.” They have also been related to the Single Responsibility Principle, the first of the five principles making up SOLID. A microservices-based architecture is typically constructed around a set of common patterns. This set of patterns is actually consistent with all of the SOLID principles when thought of at the architectural rather than the class/module level.

bosh and cloud api compatibility

Published by Matt Stine

The gauntlet has again been dropped in the world of cloud interoperability. The dueling factions include those asserting that competitors to Amazon’s web services (principally OpenStack) must adopt AWS’s API’s in order to remain viable, and those that believe such “API cloning” will do nothing more than stunt innovation. If you were to ask me, I’d say that we’ve seen this play out before. Remember the “Clone Wars” that began in the late 1980’s and that persisted for the better part of two decades?

blue green deployments on cloudfoundry

Published by Matt Stine

One of the great things about Cloud Foundry is that it is a great enabler. Tall words. But what do they mean? Essentially, Cloud Foundry (and any other well-designed PaaS) enables us to do things as developers and operators that would be extremely difficult in a traditional deployment environments. One particularly valuable area of enablement is our new found ability to practice Continous Delivery, meaning that we continuously prove our ability to deliver working software by continuously treating each code commit to a system as if it could be deployed to a production environment.